5-Week Chest and Bicep Workout Routine to Build Muscle

Chest and Bicep Workout Program

If you’re looking to build some impressive chest and bicep muscles, you need an intense workout program that will challenge your body and push it to its limits. And that’s exactly what you’ll find in this 5-Week Intense Chest and Bicep Workout Routine.

This program is designed to help you build muscle mass and strength in your chest and biceps, and it’s broken down into five weeks of progressive workouts.

So if you’re ready to get serious about your chest and bicep workouts, this intense program is for you!

The Benefits of a Chest and Bicep Workout

There are numerous benefits to having strong chest and biceps muscles. From a physical standpoint, you’ll enjoy improved posture, reduced back pain, and increased strength and stamina.

Emotionally, you’ll feel more confident in your appearance, get compliments from others about your impressive muscles, and enjoy the sense of accomplishment that comes with having worked hard to achieve a sculpted physique. No matter what your motivations are, there are plenty of good reasons to focus on building strong chest and biceps muscles!

The reason for putting these two muscles in the same workout is because the chest and biceps don’t get in each other’s way. Most people train chest with triceps and mainly use multi-joint exercises. Inevitably you’ll find that your energy levels for training triceps afterward will be low. But if you do a chest and bicep workout you will have much more energy for bicep training because they aren’t indirectly worked during chest exercises. This will result in a better overall bicep workout.

The best part about pairing up these two muscle groups on the same day? You can use heavier weights without worrying about causing damage or overworking either area too soon – which means greater growth potential

5-week Intense Chest and Bicep Workout Program

Each week of this chest and bicep workout routine will begin with 3-4 chest exercises and end with 2-3 biceps exercises. You will train chest first since it is the larger of the two muscle groups and requires the most energy.

Workouts will consist of isolation exercises and compound movements. For each compound exercise you will be working up to a 6-10 rep maximum, you can calculate your 10 rep maxes using this calculator. With this in mind, the goal is to progress with your compound top sets each week by either getting an extra rep with the same weight or increasing the weight by 5 LBs and getting the same number of reps as the prior week. Below is a video that explains how to set this up.

The objective will be to maximize the pump and achieve progressive overload, which will lead to more muscle growth.

Before each workout begins start with a warm-up. This can be something as simple as jogging in place for a few minutes or doing some light cardio on the treadmill for 5-10 minutes. Once you’re warm, it’s time to move on to the strength-training portion of the workout. Begin by warming up your shoulders with light weight or resistance bands to avoid injuries.

Here are some things to keep in mind during each workout:

  • Be sure to warm up properly
  • Perform all reps slowly and controlled
  • Be sure to eat an adequate amount of food to fuel and recover from the workouts
  • Be sure to cool down after each workout by doing some dynamic and static stretches
  • Keep track of your top sets of compound exercises each week

Week 1 | Chest Day Focused

Weeks 1 and 3 will be focused on training chest with 4 exercises and the biceps workout will consist of 2 movements. Be sure to track your top set and rep ranges for the compound movements.

Chest Workout:

Isolation Exercise 1:

  • Pec Deck Machine – 4 sets x 10-15

Compound Exercise 1:

  • Incline Barbell Bench Press (%’s of 10 Rep Max)
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Superset Workout:

  • Push-Ups and Cable Chest Fly – 3 sets x 10-15 each

Biceps Workout:

Isolation Exercise 2:

  • Dumbbell Hammer Curl – 3 sets x 15-20

Compound Exercise 2:

  • EZ Bar Preacher Curls (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Week 2 | Biceps Day Focused

Weeks 2 and 4 will be focused on training chest with 3 exercises and the biceps workout will consist of 3 movements as well. Be sure to track your top set and rep ranges for the compound movements.

Chest Workout:

Isolation Exercise 1:

  • Chest Press – 4 sets of 10-12

Compound Exercise 1:

  • Barbell Incline Bench Press (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Isolation Exercise 2:

  • Flat Bench Dumbbell Press – 4 sets x 15,12,9,6

Biceps Workout:

Superset Workout:

  • Dumbbell Hammer Curl and Incline Dumbbell Curl – 10-15 reps x 2 sets each

Compound Exercise 2:

  • EZ Bar Preacher Curls (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Week 3 | Chest Day Focused

Chest Workout:

Isolation Exercise 1:

  • Incline Dumbbell Press – 3 sets x 10-15

Compound Exercise 1:

  • Barbell Incline Bench Press (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Superset Workout:

  • Push-Ups and Dumbbell Decline Bench Presses – 3 sets x 15,10,5 each

Biceps Workout:

Isolation Exercise 2:

  • Dumbbell Hammer Curls – 4 sets x 10-15

Compound Exercise 2:

  • EZ Bar Preacher Curls (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Week 4 | Biceps Day Focused

Chest Workout:

Isolation Exercise 1:

  • Cable Chest Fly – 3 sets x 15-20

Compound Exercise 1:

  • Barbell Incline Bench Press (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Isolation Exercise 2:

  • Incline Dumbbell Press – 3 sets x 10-15

Bicep Workout:

Superset Workout:

  • Incline Dumbbell Curl and Dumbbell Hammer Curl – 3 sets x 10-15 each

Compound Exercise 2:

  • EZ Bar Preacher Curls (%’s of 10 Rep Max):
    1. Warmup Sets – 50% x 10-12, 70% x 8-10
    2. Top Set – 100% x 6-10
    3. Back Off Sets – 70% x 8-10, 50% x 10-12

Week 5 | Deload Day

In week 5 of this chest and bicep workout split, we will be doing what is called a deload day. After 4 weeks of working our muscles to the max, it’s important to give the muscle fibers some time to rest and allow our CNS to recover by lowering the training volume and intensity.

Focus on using light weights and take this day to work on proper form and mind-to-muscle connection. Then next week feel free to restart the program from week 1 and make any changes you feel necessary.

Deload Chest Day Portion:

  1. Peck Deck Machine – 3 sets of 10-12
  2. Barbell Incline Bench Press – 3 sets of 8-10
  3. Push-Ups – 2 sets of 10-15

Deload Bicep Day Portion:

  1. Hammer Dumbbell Curls – 3 sets of 10-15
  2. EZ Bar Preacher Curls – 3 sets of 8-12

How To Do Each Exercise

Pec Deck Fly Machine

  1. Adjust the height of the pec machine to fit your body stature.
  2. Position the handles so they are locked into a chest fly position.
  3. Sit down on the bench and grip the handles with your hands.
  4. With your arms extended, push the handles in front of you, leaving a 1-2 inch gap between them, and squeeze your chest.
  5. Hold for a second and then slowly return to the starting position, repeat.

Incline Barbell Bench Press

  1. Set an adjustable bench to an incline angle
  2. Lie on it with a barbell in your hands and shoulder blades retracted
  3. Slowly lower the barbell to your chest
  4. Lift the barbell back to the starting position
  5. Repeat for the desired number of repetitions

Push-ups

  1. Position your body face down on the floor with your palms flat on the floor and shoulder-width apart.
  2. Bend your elbows and slowly lower your body towards the floor.
  3. Keep your back straight, do not let it sag.
  4. Push yourself back up to the starting position.

Cable Chest Flies

  1. Connect a stirrup handle to the pulleys of a cable crossover machine and adjust them to your preferred height.
  2. Step forward so that the cable is taut and your hands are even with your chest.
  3. Flare your elbows and pull the handles together until they are close to touching in the middle of your chest.
  4. Slowly reverse the motion, returning to the starting position.
  5. Repeat for the desired number of repetitions.

This exercise is notorious for providing a good stretch in your chest muscles.

Dumbbell Hammer Curls

  1. Choose a weight for your dumbbells.
  2. Standing with your feet hip-width apart, hold a dumbbell in each hand with your palms facing your thighs, and squeeze the weights tightly.
  3. Curl the dumbbells up towards your shoulders, keeping your palms facing your thighs the entire time.
  4. Pause at the top of the curl, then slowly lower the dumbbells back to the starting position.
  5. Repeat for the desired number of repetitions.

EZ Bar Preacher Curls

  1. Sit on the preacher bench with an EZ bar in both hands.
  2. Curl the bar up towards your shoulders, keeping your elbows pressed against the pad and your shoulder blades tight.
  3. Pause briefly at the top of the curl and then lower the bar back to the starting position.

Chest Press

  1. Adjust the seat height and backrest to fit your body size.
  2. Position your hands on the grip bars, slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.
  3. Keep your feet flat on the ground and press your hips and glutes firmly into the backrest.
  4. Inhale and slowly lower the weight down to your chest.
  5. Exhale and press the weight back up to the starting position.
  6. Repeat for the desired number of repetitions.
  7. When finished, return the weight stacks to their respective uprights.

Flat Bench Dumbbell Fly (Twist Press)

  1. Lie flat on a bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand with an overhand grip.
  2. Bring the weights to the side of your chest.
  3. Then press them upward, and rotate your palms into a neutral grip, until your arms are straight over your chest.
  4. Lower the weights back to the starting position, while rotating them back to an overhand grip, and repeat.

Incline Dumbbell Curl

  1. Sit on an incline bench with a weight in each hand, palms facing forward.
  2. Curl the weights up towards your shoulders, keeping your elbows close to your sides.
  3. Pause briefly at the top of the curl before slowly lowering the weights back to the starting position.
  4. Repeat for more reps.

Incline Dumbbell Press

  1. Lie on an incline bench with a dumbbell in each hand, palms facing forward.
  2. Position your feet flat on the floor and press the dumbbells straight up over your chest, maintaining a slight bend in your elbows.
  3. From here, slowly lower the weights back towards your chest, being careful not to let them touch down.
  4. Once the weights are at your chest, press them back up to the starting position and repeat for desired reps.

Dumbbell Decline Bench Press

  1. Lie on your back on a declined bench and hold a pair of dumbbells with your palms facing your feet.
  2. Extend your arms straight above you and slowly lower the weights to the sides of your chest.
  3. Pause and press the weights back up to the starting position.

Targeted Muscle Groups

Bicep Muscles

The bicep muscles are located in the front of the upper arms, and they are responsible for bending the arm at the elbow and are attached to the bones of the arm by tendons. The tendons of the biceps muscles attach to the shoulder blade, the collarbone, and the upper arm bone.

The biceps are made up of two muscles: the short head and the long head. The short head is located on the inside of the arm, and the long is located on the outside of the arm.

The biceps muscles are used to lift objects, such as weights, and to pull the arm down. The biceps muscles are also used to keep the arm from moving when the body is at rest.

They are made up of two types of fibers: slow-twitch and fast-twitch.

The biceps muscles are innervated by the musculocutaneous nerve. This nerve supplies the muscles with signals from the brain that tell the muscles when to contract.

You can get an arm amazing workout just by doing a few sets of bicep curls for high reps.

Chest Muscles

The chest muscles are responsible for the movement of the arms, and they include the pectoralis major and minor muscles. The pectoralis major is a large, fan-shaped muscle that covers the front of the chest, and the pectoralis minor is a smaller, triangular muscle that lies beneath the pectoralis major. These muscles work together to bring the arm across the body (adduction) and to rotate the arm inward (internal rotation). The chest muscles also help to stabilize the shoulder joint.

Brachialis Muscle

The Brachialis Muscle is a muscle located on the anterior (front) surface of the humerus (upper arm bone). It is responsible for elbow flexion and is innervated by the Musculocutaneous nerve.

The brachialis is generally a stronger muscle than the biceps brachii and is often used in rehabilitation exercises following a biceps tendon rupture. Adding hammer curls to your bicep workout routine is a great way to target the brachialis.

Deltoid Muscle

The deltoid muscle is a large, triangular muscle that protects the shoulder joint. It is responsible for abduction (lifting the arm out to the side), flexion (bending the arm at the elbow), and extension (straightening the arm). The deltoid is composed of three parts: the anterior deltoid, medial deltoid, and posterior deltoid. Each part attaches to different areas of the shoulder blade (scapula) and humerus (upper arm bone). The deltoid muscle is innervated by the axillary nerve.

Try This Chest and Bicep Workout Program!

In this blog post, we’ve outlined a chest and bicep workout that you can do at the gym. This routine is designed to help you build muscle and get a stronger upper body. If you want to see results, be sure to follow the instructions carefully and give yourself enough time to rest in between sets. What are your thoughts on this workout routine? Let us know in the comments below! Thank you for reading.

Eric Decremer
Eric Decremer

Eric is an ISSA Certified Personal Trainer and competes in the USPA Powerlifting Association. Feel free to contact him anytime at edecremer@wildnswole.com!

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